This website was created by Live & Learn, Inc. to provide the public access to resources about peer respites in the United States. The resources available on PeerRespite.net include the criteria and definition of a Peer Respitea, the Peer Respite Directory (updated in 2018), the Guidebook for Peer Respite Self-Evaluation, and reports from the Peer Respite Essential Features Surveys conducted in 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016, and 2018, which document nationwide trends in organizational characteristics and policies. PeerRespite.net also hosts a repository of research on peer respites.

No longer an active project, PeerRespite.net now serves as an archive for work that was completed prior to 2019. 

What are peer respites?

A peer respite is a voluntary, short-term, overnight program that provides community-based, non-clinical crisis support to help people find new understanding and ways to move forward. It operates 24 hours per day in a homelike environment. 

Peer respites are staffed and operated by people with psychiatric histories or who have experienced trauma and/or extreme states. This means that...

STAFF

  • 100% of staff have lived experience of extreme states and/or the behavioral health system

MANAGEMENT

  • All individuals in program/house management positions have lived experience of extreme states and/or the mental health system

  • Job descriptions for program/house management positions require lived experience of extreme states and/or the mental health system

GOVERNANCE

  • The peer respite is either operated by a peer-run organization OR has an advisory group with 51% or more members having lived experience of extreme states and/or the behavioral health system

PEER-RUN ORGANIZATION

  • A program or organization in which a majority of persons who oversee the organization’s operation and are in positions of control have lived experience of extreme states and/or the mental health system.

  • People with lived experience of extreme states and/or the mental health system constitute a majority of the board or advisory group, and the director and a majority of staff, including volunteers, must identify as people lived experience of extreme states and/or the mental health system.

  • See works cited at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201400080

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Why are there peer respites?

Peer respites were designed as psychiatric hospital diversion programs to support individuals experiencing or at-risk of a psychiatric crisis. The premise behind peer respites is that psychiatric emergency services can be avoided if less coercive or intrusive supports are available in the community.

See our Research page...

How do peer respites work?

Peer respites engage guests in mutual, trusting relationships with peer staff. Peer support involves a process of mutual helping based on the principles of respect and shared responsibility. Peer support includes interactions in which individuals help themselves and others through fostering relationships and engaging in advocacy to empower people to participate in their communities.

See our Resources page...


About this Website

This website was created to have an organized space for information about peer respites in the United States. No longer an active project, PeerRespite.net now serves as an archive for work that was completed prior to 2019. 

Consensus panel on inclusion criteria:

A panel of experts in peer support research, training, advocacy, and program administration developed these specific criteria. This consensus panel examined program structures and policies and considered the tradition and history of the consumer/survivor movement in creating and operating alternatives to traditional mental health services. All of the panel members have experience working in or with peer respites and peer-run organizations in the U.S. 

Contributors and Advisory Group:

Special thanks to Keris Myrick, formerly of SAMHSA’s Center for Mental Health Services, for her input.